Derelict Space

Fire on the Hills

by markdyal

The deer were bounding like blown leaves
Under the smoke in front the roaring wave of the brush-fire;
I thought of the smaller lives that were caught.
Beauty is not always lovely; the fire was beautiful, the terror
Of the deer was beautiful; and when I returned
Down the back slopes after the fire had gone by, an eagle
Was perched on the jag of a burnt pine,
Insolent and gorged, cloaked in the folded storms of his shoulders
He had come from far off for the good hunting
With fire for his beater to drive the game; the sky was merciless
Blue, and the hills merciless black,
The sombre-feathered great bird sleepily merciless between them.
I thought, painfully, but the whole mind,
The destruction that brings an eagle from heaven is better than mercy.

Robinson Jeffers, from Thurso’s Landing.

Overcoming the Bourgeois Form of Life

by markdyal

Starts at home.

The State Needs Slaves So that they May Need the State

by markdyal

“The industrial age made it increasingly difficult for individuals to take full responsibility for themselves.” Karl Polanyi, The Great Transformation.

“In My Leisure Time I Watch TV or a Movie, or Play Facebook.” “Good, Very Good.”

by markdyal

“Words are still the principal instruments of control. Suggestions. Persuasions. Orders. No control machine so far devised can operate without words, because only words create the subtleties and ambiguities needed to manufacture the opposition and acquiescence, without which, there is no control.” William Burroughs, “The Limits of Control,” Schizo-Culture: The Book, 38.

If What You Love Holds You Back, It Doesn’t Love You

by markdyal

“Make your loves into war-machines, and create your wars as love-machines.” Eugene Holland, Deleuze and Guattari’s A Thousand Plateaus, 138 (translation modified).

Make a Withdrawal

by markdyal

Q: What are banks for?

A: To make money.

Q: For the customers?

A: For the banks.

Q: How do banks make money?

A: Customers lend it to them, and they lend it to other customers, each time charging interest.

Q: How much interest?

A: It depends on the bank. They set the rate as a rate of profit.

Q: Why isn’t it my profit? It’s my money after all.

A: You make a profit as long as you don’t withdraw your money: usually around half of one percent.

Q: Why do I need a bank at all?

A: You have to pay for goods and services that will not take cash.

Q: Why won’t they take cash? It seems a system designed to guarantee the banks a profit.

A:

Q: And why would I need a bank if I didn’t want to withdraw my money?

A:

Q: Hello? Why would a bank not want me to withdraw my money?

A: Because if you withdraw it they can’t lend it to anyone else.

Q: And if I remove my money which has been lent to someone else?

A: The bank will give you someone else’s money.

Q: But suppose that person wanted his/hers too? What if everyone wanted his/her money at once?

A: It’s the theory of banking practice that they never would.

Adapted from G. Edward Griffin. The Creature from Jekyll Island and Punch.

… But only for Beasts of Prey

by markdyal

“Ideals are cowardice.” Oswald Spengler, Man and Technics, 33.